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01. Q: Why do I need an uninterruptible power supply (UPS)?
02. Q: Should I put a UPS at each workstation?
03. Q: How do I determine what size UPS to get?
04. Q: Why Do I Need UPSMON (The Power Monitoring and Automatic Shutdown Software)?
05. Q: Can UPS Software from One UPS Manufacturer be used With a Different Brand of UPS?
06. Q: What is Buck and Boost?
07. Q: What is a "Smart" UPS?
08. Q: Is there Any Equipment I should Not Connect to My UPS?
09. Q: The charge light (Yellow) on my King Office UPS is always illuminated, is this unit defective?
10. Q: There is no power from my King Office UPS, I pushed the power switch button and nothing happens?
11. Q: What are the symptoms of "bad power"?
12. Q: What are the consequences of power problems?
13. Q: How can power problems be avoided?
14. Q: The mouse uses COM 1 and COM 3 is used by an internal modem. The UPS cable is connected to COM 2 but there is still a conflict. What will cause this?
15. Q: What is SNMP?
16. Q: What is the battery life span for my UPS?
17. Q: How do I know when to replace the battery for my UPS?

1. Q: Why do I need an uninterruptible power supply (UPS)?
A: If you need optimum performance and longevity from your electronic equipment and if you need a reliable short-term backup power source in the event of a blackout, then you need a UPS to protect your equipment.
2. Q: Should I put a UPS at each workstation?
A: Yes, it is a good idea because this is where the most recent work is being done, and this data is most vulnerable to loss or corruption in the event of power outage.
3. Q: How do I determine what size UPS to get?
A: UPS's are sized by their volt-amp (VA) load. To calculate the VA load of your system check the UL label for the operating voltage and amperage drawn*. Add the amperages of each component to be powered by the UPS and multiply the number by the voltage (120V for US applications). This number is your VA load and the minimum size required.
It is a good idea to size your UPS at least 30% larger than minimum VA load to leave room for future needs. *Note: Many computers' UL label list 3 or 4 amps. This is a maximum draw. Typical computers will draw 1 to 2 amps under a standard configuration.
4. Q: Why Do I Need UPSMON (The Power Monitoring and Automatic Shutdown Software)?
A: During a power interruption, a decision must be made when and if to gracefully shutdown the computer system. On a computer system that always has someone within earshot and eyeshot, this is usually done manually - when the UPS kicks on during a power failure, the administrator decides whether to ride it out on battery power or to save files and close programs.
However, on an unattended computer system, nobody is around to make that decision. In this case, during a power failure, the UPS will kick on and run the computer system, but only until its battery is depleted.
Therefore, it is important to have automatic shutdown software that will safely shut down the computer system after a pre-configured time period of when the computer receives a low battery signal from the UPS. UPS monitoring and automatic shutdown software also can broadcast power fail messages to network workstations, keep an historical log of abnormal power conditions, and alert the system to page the administrator.
5. Q: Can UPS Software from One UPS Manufacturer be used With a Different Brand of UPS?
A: Generally not, different software programs have different ways of communicating; use different cable topologies, and different brands of UPSs have different pin assignments on the serial interface port on the UPS.
6. Q: What is Buck and Boost?
A: Buck and boost are terms used in reference to certain types of voltage regulation. A UPS with built-in voltage regulation capabilities provides correction of over voltage and under voltage situations. Buck lowers a high voltage and boost raises a low voltage.
7. Q: What is a "Smart" UPS?
A: The real meaning of "smart" UPS is one, which has a built-in microprocessor and RS-232 interface port. Many people mistakenly believe that in order to have an automatic shutdown capability, an UPS must be "smart". In fact, a UPS with a contact closure serial interface port can normally do an automatic shutdown.
A "smart" UPS adds the additional functionality of being able to monitor more operating parameters, for example: Input & Output Voltage, Input & Output Frequency, Load Level, Battery Level, Battery Level, and etc.
8. Q: Is there Any Equipment I should Not Connect to My UPS?
A: In general, you shouldn't connect a laser printer to your UPS because a laser printer draws tremendous amount of power and will likely overload your UPS and cause the UPS fuse to blow. Most other office equipment, such as computers, monitors, fax machines, and networking equipment, should work fine with most UPSs. Do bear in mind that larger size monitors consume much more power than smaller monitors and will likely reduce battery runtime significantly.

You should not connect a Surge Suppressor at the output of UPS. If you have a Surge Suppressor need to be used, please plug the Surge Suppressor to the receptacle on the wall, and plug the UPS to the Surge Suppressor, so that in case the Surge Suppressor activated under Spike strike, the closure of MOV in the Surge Suppressor will not create a short circuit and damage the UPS.

9. Q: The charge light (Yellow) on my King Office UPS is always illuminated, is this unit defective?
A: The charging light is normally illuminated on King Office Models (KOF-500S, KOF-600S, KOF-750S).
10. Q: There is no power from my King Office UPS, I pushed the power switch button and nothing happens?
A: The power switch is located on the top of the unit and labeled "on/test". To turn the UPS on, depress the button and hold if down (for about 2 to 3 seconds) until the green LED light "Line OK" turns on and stays on. When the unit is activated, it performs a self-test for a short period of time. During this process, the Line OK light will turn off momentarily and the Backup LED will turn on. After approximately 2 seconds, the Backup LED turns off and the Link OK LED will turn on and remain steady.
11. Q: What are the symptoms of "bad power"?
A: Commonly, bad power causes a computer's monitor and indicator lights to waver or flicker, unexplained errors in data transmission, sudden loss of Internet access, a system lockup, aborted modem transfers, and hard drive crashes.
12. Q: What are the consequences of power problems?
A: Even minor power problems can cost you money. Anytime a power interruption delays your work in progress, that's your valuable time you've lost, and lost time means lost money.
More serious and expensive, is the fact that power problems can not only corrupt expensive data files, but also can permanently damage computers, networks, and precision electronics.
13. Q: How can power problems be avoided?
A: By always connecting your sensitive electronic equipment to a power conditioner, surge protector, and for the best protection an uninterruptible power system (UPS). Problems such as blackouts cannot be eliminated, but the damage they cause can be prevented with a UPS, which maintains a steady flow of power until the system can be safely or automatically shut down.
14. Q: The mouse uses COM 1 and COM 3 is used by an internal modem. The UPS cable is connected to COM 2 but there is still a conflict. What will cause this?
A: The default hardware interrupt (IRQ) settings for COM 1 and COM 2 are IRQ 4 and IRQ 3 respectively. If the modem on COM 3 is using IRQ 3 there will be a conflict with the UPS on COM 2. Since serial devices cannot share a communications port or its hardware interrupts, the interrupt for the modem must be altered. Check with the modem manual to find out how to change the IRQ setting. Suggested IRQ includes 5 and 10. If there are no free IRQ's in your system, you can use IRQ7 since LPT1 is capable of sharing its IRQ.
15. Q: What is SNMP?
A: Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a family of protocols that provide a means for monitoring and controlling networked devices. Computer vendors have built into some network devices, including some UPS models, network management capabilities so that you can query their status remotely, as devices are usually referred to as "smart" devices.
16. Q: What is the battery life span for my UPS?
A: The batteries life span is 3-5 years, depending on the amount of time the battery is used in back up.
17. Q: How do I know when to replace the battery for my UPS?
A: When the battery fault light indicator is lit, this usually means something is wrong with the battery. To check the battery for defects, use a voltmeter. If the battery measures 12 volts, or above, it may be fine. If the battery measures less than 12 volts and cannot be charged back to normal, the battery is defective and needs to be replaced.

 




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